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. at the highest levels of united states government, we are committed to helping the drc and its neighbors in this cycle of violence and instability so we do not find ourselves back -- so that we do not find ourselves in another three years with another crisis in the vrsc. the secretary clinton, ambassador riesch, undersecretary for political affairs and ambassador windy sherman high and -- and i have all met with an spoken with the rwandan and rwanda and officials in the past few weeks for a rapid and peaceful resolution to the crisis. i have travelled to the region just last month with my british and french counterparts to press the condoleezza, rwanda in, and ugandan governments to work together and start the crisis and address the causes of instability. and all three governments reiterated to us their shared goals -- their share gold -- shared goals. all three indicated to was that the most abusive commanders are now under targeted sanctions and we have placed those same individuals under u.s. sanctions. talks between the garcia government and the environment -- m 23 began on december
"our form of government has no sense unless it is founded in the deeply felt religious faith and i do not care what it is." he received a much ridicule from his cultured despise years. his professed indifference to the major of the religious faith. it is the first part of the statement that deserves continuing attention. certainly many americans, perhaps the majority of them, agreed that democracy or at least our democracy, which is based on a belief in natural rights, presupposes religious faith. people believe this that all people are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights. there are two separate propositions that are pertinent to any consideration of the role of religion in american politics. one is an empirical question. is it a fact that the success of a democracy requires a religious people governing themselves by religious norms? the second question is a question of logic. does belief in america as distinctive and democracy, a limited government whose limits are defined by the natural rights of the government, do those entail religious beliefs? regarding the e
-fire between government and rebel forces.o >> there are many other organizations that do medical care and food provisions. never enough. what is new here is civilians protecting civilians. >> ifill: itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. >> we'll hock the person to buy our bread. if you believe the headlines, then we're sunk. greece downgraded deeper into junk. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: much
profiles a group of peacekeepers struggling to maintain a fragile cease-fire between government and rebel forces. itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: the election commission in egypt confirmed today the new constitution won nearly 64% of the vote in a referendum. the panel also reported turnout was just a third of the country's 52 million registered voters. president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood backed the draft constitution. opponents warned it paves the way for islamic rule and curbs on civil liberties. the six persian gulf arab nations demanded an end to what they called iranian interference. they issued a statement today at the end of the gulf cooperation council's annual summit. the statement gave no details. the six u.s. allied countries, also called for swift international action to end the bl
into england. fly them over there, seized the airfield. the shock might be so great that the british government will cave in or negotiate your instead what the germans did was, of course they stop at the ocean. then he turned south and they wanted to knock france out of the war, which is what they did. they entered paris on june 16, i think. the government in paris led to the south. they were practically in a different city every day. and churchill hoped and pleaded with the french to continue fighting. both countries have pledged, one to another, that they would not drop out of the war and make a separate peace, unless they were released from this pledge by the other. the french began to think that they would want to make a separate peace, and they began to talk to the british about this. churchill said no, we can't release you from that pledge. we want you to keep fighting all the way down to the mediterranean, if you have to. and if you have to across the mediterranean, keep fighting from north africa. and a big part of the reason was that the french fleet was a very, very large fleet. many
i will carry the report to london. they decided they could not afford it. the royal government sent their own report. so in 1775 that is why the massachusetts government was not willing to spend the money. they knew they could be skipped if they did not. >>. >> we will continue questions downstairs. also signings of the book. let's continue downstairs. for our panelists. robert, a tired, and john todd andrlik is a publisher of raglan did, >> it is always a treat to be in this store it is a wonderland. about five years ago a friend suggested that i share rightabout ms. green. [laughter] i said to? she was called the which up on wall street. she was interesting but finance and wall street? then it was 2008. and everything changed the stock market collapsed collapsed, real-estate prices plunged and we were in a financial panic i started to think more about ms. green and how she's survived ms. green and how she's survived many financial crisis. there were no diaries then i remember something that was said that nice girls keep diaries. bad girls do not have time last laugh and hetty gree
we are going to have to get eight bigger truck. that's what the government is trying to do. borrow the way out of debt. it is impossible . it never worked in the history of the world . dr. art's curve works every single time. >> we are up against the end of the show. we have kelly wright and healther childers. play us out in the new year or satted afternoon with your song all of the gold in california . thank you for watching and here is it larry gatlin. >> never was appropriate. ♪ all the gold in california. ♪ is in a bank in the middle of beverly hills in somebody else's name. >> a fox news alert. senate leaders now holding crucial fiscal cliff talks on capitol hill rushing to come up with a last ditch agreement to avoid deep spending cuts and year end tax hikes affecting the lives of every american, i'm kelly wright. >> i'm heather childers in for jamie colby. the 11th he hour scramble after a crucial meeting on friday, between president obama and the leaders of the house and senate and urged lawmakers to urge them to do whatever it takes to cut a deal. >> i'm modestly opti
before they went into government. but about the queen and the family and lifting the vail. you thrift veil and this is an extraordinary world we've never seen inside of. so "the queen r queen" came directly from the deal. >> what did tony blair think of it? >> next question. >> i want to know president obama said "homeland" is his favorite show. my question is when you're dealing with live, real people who you are portraying or in the case of "homeland" or "24" when you're trying to deal with agencies that you are representing, what is that interaction like? we were talking a little bit in the room next door, maybe you can answer michael, how is tony blair's perception changed as a result of those films or the queen's perception changed in the minds of the public then we can talk about "homeland" and "24"? >> there are many things that you realize that you are working with when you do a film or a tv show that is -- has so much political emphasis. and one of the things is inevitably you come up against the agenda of people in terms of the agendas they have for looking at and judging po
originally called in response to set oralism in government, which i prefer -- secularism in government, which are for. a country which invites everyone into it, all religions and nationalities, must by definition be secular. any religious direction we choose is going to favor somebody, and i thought that is what we were trying to avoid. at least i thought that is what jefferson meant when he talked about religious freedoms. host: ok. caller: freedom from religion. host: when you go to vote in a presidential election or congressional election, what are the big factors in your decision? caller: usually economic. i did not consider -- i don't consider religion unless it interferes with some legislation. it plays a very little role in my life. host: would you call yourself unaffiliated religiously? caller: relatively i am an atheist. so, yes, i am unaffiliated. host: here is the "christian science monitor," their cover. the new face of faith. what is happening in new england, the countries most secular region, may have a future of american religion. traditional religions are seeing their ranks th
begin to realize they need a stronger federal government to reroute archons dictation. many, many americans were posted to comp dictation and he became the anti-federalist. they were the federalist and anti-federalist, bitterly opposed to each other from the very beginning, from the signing of the constitution. the anti-federalist gradually became no as republican and democrat republicans. so when john quincy adams was running for office, you now how the republicans or democrat republicans running against the federalist and he was the last of the federalists. the federalist rambis from the beginning, washington and the people who ran the country were really friendly elite. the constitution only other property owners. gradually universal suffrage came in, not universal involving women. don't get your hopes up too high it was white male suffrage, but she didn't have to be a property owner and that was what pushed to the elite out of power. adams, jefferson, monroe's, all these great plantation owners and property owners and elite leaders really permitted the growth of jacksonian dem
a denunciation of big government liberalism or big government programs. you can see his anti-communism is evolving, his cultural view is evolving. he has not yet gained or acquired the tax-cut philosophy which fit so nicely into his optimistic outlook of empowering individuals to determine their own lives. >> saturday night at 8:00 eastern, craig shirley on the political campaigns of ronald reagan, part of four days of american history tv, right through new year's day, on c- span3. >> you think of washington before the civil war. you think slavery was well entrenched. black people were miserable. that is not true at all. in washington, washington had about 30,000 people as a city. 12,000 of them were black. the majority free, no slaves. >> what led to the first race riots? jefferson morley recounts what happened, part of what today's through new year's day on c- span2's book tv. >> "washington journal" continues. host: damian paletta join us here at the table. thank you for joining us. this is the fourth time that congress has had a post- christmas lame duck session. what doe
the benefits of a government-insured reverse mortgage. it will eliminate your monthly mortgage payments and give you tax-free cash from the equity in your home. and here's the best part -- you still own your home. take control of your retirement today. ♪ ♪ >>> as folks dig out, the flight delays delays rack up. nearly 1300 flights canceled so far. mike tobin is at chicago's o'hare with the latest. >> when you talk about the flight cancellations, the hubs of o'hare, atlanta, did not get hit so the megaripple didn't happen. the places that you see the cancel legislations are the destination. ohio, michigan, indiana, stretching all the way to the eastern seaboard. if that city is socked in, there's where the flights are canceled. it's a serious storm. you might have mentioned six people were killed, mostly people who elected to get out on the roadways. these are states like iowa, indiana, central illinois, where more than a foot of snow came on down. all of those people who made it to destinations for christmas are trying to get home. between them and home is snow, ice, and gusts up to
of their recruiting. >> they realize this but it would be hard for any government agent to say i'm going to support a buy polar agent who is sleeping with an as lamb i can radical. >> in some ways it highlights those things more in terms of one person. through the whole journey of frost nixon, his relationship which garn in a small theater in london, then broadway, then a movie. the very first preview performance of frost nixon in a theater in london, the entire back row was lawyers, the third preview david there was having been given the all clear or told you should go see it yourself and he was shaken by it to begin w. for a man who is incredibly generous and warm and positive and supportive of everything, i think he felt very confused by how he should react to this. and as the whole thing went on as it started to become clear this was going to be a massive hit in terms of the play and the theater version of it, he started to get behind it because he's a very good business man and he started to go, well, okay, there is a certain amount of this i don't believe actually happened and is not true and
a country, we have the articles of confederation, and that government's two weeks, writing the constitution. this is where the second amendment obviously comes in. how did that all development? what's the -- >> guest: well, nowadays it's become fashionable among people who support gun rights strongly to pick out this or that quotation from this or that leader like samuel adams, thomas jefferson, or whoever and apply the second amendment was seen as a way to enable individuals to defend themselves and defend themselves against the government when it was tie tyrannical. that's a mismonsing. it was a political matter, the second amount. it was part of what became the bill of rights, and the reason for it is that when -- after the unhappy experience of the articles of confederation that led the founders to try to figure out a better way to govern the country, they came up with the constitution which we know is full of checks and balances, but as it was submitted to the states for ratification, it became clear that they might not get the nine states needed unless there were promises of still mor
. this now is an admission which the government has been very reluctant to make but which reflects the actual reality. so there you have the full -- politics and religion because the weapon, the motivation of the foot soldiers, is to create an islamic state in nigeria. it's not something that anybody dreams of. there are videos, the usual two rifles crossing each other, and we want an islamic state. in fact, one of their leaders went so far, when the government was -- political leaders were proposing amnesty and talk, no, going to talk to the president as a christian, until he converts. then we're willing to sit down and negotiate with him. and so each time i hear the government say, oh, please come on, talk to us, we'll listen now. we don't know what you want. i said, don't be stupid. they said it so often and you know very well what their motivation is. that is the reason for the devastation of the north today. a country in which utter years, years of independence, certain sections of the country consider the rest nonmuslims, whether christians, or whatever, as subhumans. disposable materia
between 40 and $65,000 a year will have to pay an extra two grand to the government. gregg: coming up we'll talk with republican nick mulvaney whose house budget committee is obviously on the forefront of the fiscal talk. so we'll try to get the latest from him in just a moment. patti ann: meanwhile, gregg, we have new warnings from the treasury department that if a fiscal deal isn't reached our government will have to turn to extraordinary measures when the debt limit hits its ceiling. $16.4 trillion probably on monday. fox business network's stuart varney joins us now. hi, stu. you say this is the big story people aren't talking about? >> it is a sleeper issue, patti ann. on monday the government officially runs out of money and it can not borrow anymore. so it will have to shift all kind of cash around to make sure they can pay their bills and maybe they can do that for a couple of months. means you can kick the can, eight weeks be maybe, until the absolute crunch comes. there are consequences to this. it could be that america will be downgraded again. after all back in august of 2011
will officially re-sign from his post on friday. he stressed that italy's next government must avoid backtracking on reforms. elections are due to return in january. sylvia berlusconi met up with cnbc and began by asking him whether he will be running in the upcoming elections. >> translator: yes. obviously, this wasn't my original intention or a desirable option. i had to surrender to reality. and my sense of responsibility convinced me to run again for a premiership. actually, this need come from the polls. a angelino alfamo is capable, but only my participation would have brought back all the voters who supported us in 2008 which represented almost 40% of the total of italian voters. i had to admit what the data was saying as i did in 2004. i feel the need to return to the political arena to prevent the country from being delivered into the hands of a leftist party that isn't at all social democratic, but has its roots firmly pointed in the communist orthodox party. >> under market and in europe, there is some concern that your return in politics may bring back italy to the latest borrow of 20
thing the next government needs to do is actually nothing. if it does nothing, if it doesn't reverse the reforms -- >> what's interesting is what berlusconi is campaigning on is austerity. he's running on an ant anti-austerity pro eu package. while it's untenable, it does have a certain amount of certainly backtracking the fiscal returns for them. >> exactly. this property tax, i think that's a cause for concern. if you were to repeal that, the fiscal position on would be unsustainable and he would have to raise taxes elsewhere to make up for that. that would be some messy negotiations with him on a european level. markets would be very concerned already heading into the elections. the more noise we hear, the higher italian borrowing costs would be and if italian borrowing costs rise, one of the very important parameters which led to this drop in debt to gdp over these 15 years heading into the crisis would not be fulfilled any more and italy's position would be unsustainable because of all that noise. >> it sounds like a catalyst should this fall into place in 2013. that still remai
it takes as much if not more courage to speak out against our government. it is that other countries that seek out and oppose actions. the ability to criticize and question our leaders is the essence of democracy, if we did not permit senate views than those who would confront inquiries arcola conference, how much longer would we have had slavery? how much longer with the vietnam war has dragged on and the japanese-americans interned during world war ii still be awaiting redress? i hope the mistakes made and suffering imposed upon japanese-americans nearly 60 years ago will not be repeated against arab-americans whose loyalties are now being called into question. there profiler start to resemble what the enemy looks like. let us not repeat history. he was a wise, good man. the reason he could be courageous without being sanctimonious. the reason he could be so generous and old-fashioned like gallant without seeming pompous. the reason he could be friends across the aisles and find principal compromise without sacrificing principle is because that is who he was, a whole person, united
geithner. it could delay the tax filings. the government relies on august revenue to come in and it usually comes flooding in during march and april. people need to pay their taxes, but they don't know which tax rules will apply. host: the other deadline is the debt limit. here at $16.4 trillion. guest: >> the treasury department can stop funding federal pensions and do some other maneuvers, essentially to buy them another six weeks of time. we all at this last year. closer they get to that is when financial markets will start going crazy. the debates we are having now about tax and spending will likely be the same debates we are having six weeks from now. host: there's the u.s. debt clock. you can also see how much that is for individuals and what protection is moving ahead. our guest is damian paletta of the wall street journal. the covers finances and congress and the white house. his work is available online. from the senate floor yesterday, these comments by the senate democratic leader harry reid. [video clip] >> the speakership all members of the house back to washington today. he sh
are most vulneble. if we're going to cut the size and scope of government perhaps we should go over the fisca cliff so people will understand government spending is out of control and may start to ask questions being asked at the kitchen tables of every family, why we see christmas sales so low. they're saying how do we make major purchases? people are cutting back in personal livesthey want got to do the same. something else is playing into christmas sales being low. christmas itse is under attack. a lot of christian conservatives believe that if we're gog to say happy holid, perhaps those that think it's any other holiday should support the economy and they're not buying the gifts they used to buy. they do christian efforts locally in churches and talk to families about other things than gifts. >> we always say merry christmas here but stay on this here. if we do go over the fiscal cliff, yes, taxes will go up. molly outlined how much for every income levelcross the board. >> very hard. >> down the road, isn't it the only way we get our fiscal house back in order? >> that's what i
for anyone looking to become more familiar with how government works and the ins and outs of capitol hill. >> julie seger on c-span on verizon. c-span has been brought to you by your television provider as a public service. >> next, it is a global look at the economy with a speech by greek economist. among his many books, the economics professor recently minotaur" andobal natar we will show you as much as we can before the house gavels in at 2:00 p.m. eastern. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, france, -- friends, this is a singular honor to be a guest in this temple of civic life. thanks to all the good people for making this possible, to my publisher, the staff that are manning the barricades outside. my novel is debt crisis and the future of the world economy. i will be arguing that there is no such thing as a debt crisis. there is no debt crisis in the united states of america and europe, and there is no such thing as the debt crisis in my own country, which is nevertheless being consumed by debt. you know the joke about balloonist. the balloon has been blown off isrse, and at some p
is not balanced with the government public transport issue are not solved in one year. we're public transport continued a national priority. we can't -- [inaudible] for the like of my young cousin. we can deliver more transport to get students from point a to point b. we can build a better, brighter future for young people. so when the opposition argument say it's not a national campaign, a focus of the divided region. i tell you this, divided we are weak, but united are the nation we are strong. more nation, one notion, one campaign. better public transport. [applause] [applause] >> thank you very much ib keyed for that. i note we have been joined by the former government chief when the labour party was in office nick browne. the member of parliament. it's great to have you here. thank you for coming. to oppose the motion, i call from the east of england. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. we are here for one reason. to make contain and empower the young people that we so proudly represent. but, -- the parliament campaign for the next year to be made public transport better, and acceptabl
with the government's first position on guantanamo bay was no-man's land they already rented from cuba the majority was to the extent that the law exists in guantanamo bay. there is no other power, certainly castro is not controlling what was happening there. so, to the government said habeas corpus doesn't extend to guantanamo bay so for that purpose of this part of the usa and a follow on cases in in the lower court so all of the returns are in. >> the next question is 1i know you never get. what is your view of the nomination process that comes from fort lewis and how might it be improved to make it less frustrating were demeaning to? >> it wasn't always the way it has been for the nominations. it would include our chief justice, justice alito, justice so why -- sotomayor and justice kagan. people decided to go along party lines. contrast that with the way that it was when i was nominated in 1993 in the justice breyer the following year. my biggest supporter of the senate judiciary committee was senator orrin hatch and he confirmed that and he wrote an autobiography in which he takes great pride
the syrian government from attacks its own men, women and children. and human rights group reporting the regime shelled a bakery and a rebel held town killing 20 people, including at least 8 children. we cannot independently confirm this, of course. meanwhile, russian officials say they are set to meet with the united nations special envoy to syria this weekend. russia has repeatedly blocked the united nations from taking action against the syrian government but has recently taken steps to distance itself from the syrian regime. egypt's president mohammed morsi portion of voters opposed the enough constitution. he is calling for dialogue now to address the divisions that has polarized the nation and led to mass protests. still he had nothing concrete to offer his opponents. new document passed in a referendum with nearly 64% of the vote. critics say it restricts freedom and expands the influence of islamic law. president morsi and supporters says moderate democratic state in fighting depression, dictatorship, nepotism and corruption. the holiday shopping season is drawing to a close
say at least 20 people, many of them children, have been killed by government shelling in the north of the country, and in a setback for the government, the country's military police chief has defected. then he says he felt the army was no longer acting in the interests of the syrian people. >> the officer in this video identifies himself as the head of the military police. he says the syrian army is not protecting a country. instead, it is destroying cities and committing massacres against unarmed civilians. his defection is another blow to the regime, which is trying to contain rebel advances. the opposition is again reporting successes. this unverified internet video is said to show bubbles seizing a town on the turkish border. -- rebels seizing a town on the turkish border. the fighting continues, but in damascus, u.n. special envoy lakhdar brahimi continues his pursuit for peace. >> we have reason to hope that the meetings will have a positive outcome. we do hope so. >> for now, syrians can only hope for peace. opposition activists say the conflict has now killed more than 45,0
government pays farmers. john blackstone reports. >> who wants milk? >> me. >> me. >> me. >> reporter: with four children the rasmussen family in california drinks about five gallons a week on milk. if congress doesn't pass the bill, i would cost him $106. that has dad sean rasmussen worried. >> they have to have their milk. we might have to cut elsewhere. >> reporter: without new legislation government prices revert back to 1939 levels. back then the process was more laborious and farmers needed a higher subsidy to cover their costs. dan sumner says the new price of milk would be far above what it now costs dairy farmers to produce it. >> it really will be chaos. >> reporter: so we would go back to this old farm bill which would force the government to buy milk at an extremely high price. >> that's right. >> reporter: this could be a windfall for dairy farmers. >> well, here's the problem for dairy farmers. they don't want chaos in the milk market. it sounds good. gee, everybody will double or triple the price, but who's going to buy it? >> caller: nobody will buy it. >> nobody will
. you know just despite the court is saying the government has not backed down and was within the last few hours and saying the law will be tree ree drafted to con forp with the court's ruling. nevertheless, there is spill widespread support for this tax. they are planning to speak in belgium and wealthy entrepreneurs have moved to countries in the region that have lower taxes. today's decision could delay those departures for the time being. >> gregg: katherine, live in paris, thanks very much. >> the president may want to check out the laffer curve before he rewrites that law. when people flee or stop working that is the laffer curve. >> arthel: your french reporter was there, how about this, you got plans for new year's eve. >> gregg: that is impressive. >> it starts at 11:00 p.m. eastern and megyn kelly and bill hemmer will bring you the event live in times square and new york city. you can be a part of the broadcast by texting your happy new year's messages to the show. here how you do it. you type the the u text, got it. type a space and ascend brief message. utext space and your
relatives, nobody's safe in the city anymore. we don't really see the government picking up that as an issue. i mean safety is the first thing that you would assure to a citizen, right? >> reporter: this isn't the first time a rape case has been reported. but many more never are, but this case has become a lightning rod in india. dissolution with the government -- protesters say enough is enough. >> the brutality of this crime and the way it has been handled kind of insensitive treatment that some of the statements that some of the politicians and some of the people have made ensure that not only me -- i mean everybody has come out to see that this is not done and we are not okay with this. >> they want to see the government take concrete steps to address their concerns. >> surely, definitely. then you know, just faster justice systems. you need to have special courts when it's not open to the public. i think that's still a provision, but you need to have more courts and better hearing and stronger systems. >> reporter: it's no longer about one girl or one particular rape case. it's about in
geithner warned the government would hit its legal borrow i borrowing limit i limit by monday. geithner says the treasury will be forced to take, quote, extraordinary measures to keep paying the bills. he also referenced the impending fiscal cliff, which threatens to derail the economy if a compromise can't be reached by next week on those big unanswered issues. with both sides locked in the standoff, house republicans are calling on senate democrats to act first. democrats aren't budging much on their demands. they want to extend tax cuts and incomes below $250,000, prolong unemployment benefits, and delay those sweeping spending cuts. sam stein. >> yes. >> what happens in -- and it appears it will happen -- we go off the fiscal cliff for a few days? >> not much, is my understanding. kwb, over time, it will have much more of an impact, and it's unknown exactly what the market's psyche will do with respect to the government's inability to come together. with respect to the tax hikes, it won't be as bad as the rhetoric is suggesting early on. whether it's enough to actually get people to
is that we celebrate. so, 225 years ago, let's say august, 1787, self-government exists almost nowhere on the planet outside of the new world. you have a few sheep and herders in switzerland before there were swiss banks. [laughter] and holland in the netherlands are in the process of losing self-government and england has the house of commons but also has the house of lords and a hereditary king and so, you look back -- so it's a vast multitude on the planet but no self-government in russia, and china and india and africa, most of europe. you look back through the previous millennia and you have democracy and self-government existing in very few tiny city states, athens because they can't defend themselves militarily and even when it did exist people would speak the same language and worship the same god, the same climate and culture, a very small little area. that is all of world history. and you look today, democracy is half the planet. if you asked me what changed, what was the hinge of all of that i think i would say the word we the people. 225 years ago the hinge of world history
and scope of government in a way responsible to the voters of that midterm election. instead what we're almost certain to see is an expansion of government in the name of reintroducing it. we're likely to see much bigger government long term. we're not likely to deal with entitlement reforms as we need to do. as you suggest the president is pushing some short-term spending increases often in washington turn into long-term spending increases. gregg: but, steve, bill kristol, conservative, you know what, time to throw in the towel. you do not want to get blamed for raising taxes on 98% of americans. >> right. gregg: right? >> look, bill kristol is my boss and editor at "the weekly standard" and one of most handsome and well-regarded editors in the country as everybody knows. look, i think he was making what was, in effect a practical case. there are people who are making this case behind the scenes. you have seen, he said, get it over with. move beyond this. there are others saying absolutely not. republicans can't cave on the principle of raising tacks. i think interesting thing in wh
. it is pragmatic. the united states federal government -- unless europe is dollar rise, unless they do not have dollars to spend purchasing the net exports of those who have surpluses, then they will stop having surplus. this is the surplus recycling mechanism. thus, we have the 20 years of the golden age. 60's.950's and the 19 a period of immense stability very low inflation. universal growth. we had other problems. the lease from the macroeconomic point of view, it was a golden age. why is that? -- why did it end? because the global surplus of recycling mechanism was sustained. -- could no longer be sustained. why? because the united states stopped having a surplus by the end of the 1960's. how can you recycle surplus if you cannot have it. enter a young turk in 1971. well, paul volcker -- been named may ring a bell. in 1971, paul volcker was an unknown working for another american. henry kissinger, who you may have heard of. before he became secretary of state. he was still national security advisor. volcker's paper, which are when i read a few years ago, i thought it was the most remarkable
this morning, saying the russian government's politically motivated decision will reduce adoption possibilities for children who are now under institutional care. were further concerned about statements that adoptions already under way may be stopped and hope that the russian government will allow those children who have already met and bonded with their future parents to finish the necessary legal procedures so that they can join their families. and as matthew said, there are just about 50 children that are in the pipeline right now. what senior state department officials are telling me is that they're hoping to get at least those through the pipeline, those children who have already met these parents to be able to be united with them, and then they'll work on trying to lift the whole ban, suzanne. >> elise, is there any kind of advice they're giving those families, those americans, who have already met with their potential children? what should they be doing now? >> reporter: well, right now all they can do, suzanne, is sit tight. they really -- the state department is working on these childr
a archaic 1947 law, unless the new bill is passed by december 31st, the government will be forced to buy vast quantities of milk at twice the wholesale rate. two bills are in congress. the senate passed one for $23 billion in savings. the house is looking to enact 35 billion. the sticking point the full house of representatives hasn't approved the bill. >> the farm bill is like this low hanging ornament on the congressional christmas tree that if they just embrace it, they can automatically come up with tens of billions of dollars in budget savings. and then they can figure out where else they need to cut spending after that. >> reporter: the secretary of agriculture tom vilsack has said his department is preparing a case the permanent law comes into effect. temporary solution is to attach a farm bill extension to the fiscal cliff legislation. harris? harris: is there anything besides milk we need to be aware of? are we looking potentially at higher prices among many farming commodities for example? >> reporter: yeah. it is not just the cows. it is the crops too. it is possibility the go
a major blow to the government of syria. the general of military police appeared on television last night and announced he was defecting and joining the rebels. while dozens of generals have left since the crisis started in march of last year he is one of the highest ranking officers to abandon the government. senate taliban is claiming responsibility for a suicide bombing outside a united states base in afghanistan. officials say a car bomb went off at the gates of camp chapman. it killed a security guard and two drivers. it injured six civilians. the base has been targeted by attacks in the past. >>> egypt has a new constitution. the president signed it into law. more than ten million voted to support it but more than two thirds did not participate. critics say it passed to quickly. human rights watch said it protects some rights but undermines others. >> russia's president could soon decide if americans should be ban from adopting russian children. the government voted in favor of such a ban. russian activists say it deprives children of the chance to leave orphanages. it's a response
. syria's government, however, today posted a statement on their syrian news agency website in which they blamed this on the actions of terrorists. that's the terminology they use for rebel fighters, opposition fighters in syria. they say that that town was targeted by terrorists and that because of that residents in that town called for the military, for the syrian military to intervene to help them to bring safety and restore security in that area. again, the residents we speak with clearly blaming the regime, and it's one day later and we hear of an attack on another bakery in the homs area. this is in the last few hours. you mentioned it a few minutes ago. we heard at least 15 killed, several children. very gruesome video. you see the corpse of a woman being pulled from the rubble there. the rage of the residents there about this happening is element indescribable. suzanne. >> is there any way of finding out? you have two very different stories. any way of finding out whether it's an international -- through an international body or people on the ground, who was responsible for b
. it is not based on fact or reality. someone is able to hype this notion we are agreeing to a one world government by ratified this treaty which simply embodies what has been our law for decades. the chamber endorsed it. but there is this year. -- but there is this fear of the government and being required to be accountable for having health insurance, the so-called mandate, even though there is help if you need it. >> the velocity of information through social media, radio, and tv, there is a lot of false information and it gets amplified so rapidly now. it is very hard for the facts to catch up. >> what do you tell the consumer of news and information? how do they get the best? >> i say to be a smart consumer who goes to as many different sources as possible. the consumer. if you were buying a car, he would check out -- you check out the whole record of the vehicle. be a consumer. there is a lot of information. it can be interesting and informative. when it comes to the factual record, know where to go. >> let's go to the floor for questions. >> my name is gloria. i come from europe. everybody t
reverse mortgage today, you'll learn the benefits of a government-insured reverse mortgage. it will eliminate your monthly mortgage payments and give you tax-free cash from the equity in your home. and here's the best part -- you still own your home. take control of your retirement today. ♪ ♪ o@ ♪ sing polly wolly doodle all the day ♪ ♪ hah @ >> a new york newspaper faces black lash after publishing names and addresses of local gun owners. the journal news features a interactive map with detailed information on anybody with a handgun permit. the decision to put it on line is causing a major controversy. critics say it's a privacy violation and could make gun owners a target. the paper's report says angry callers even threatened staffers. david lee miller, a lot of people are speaking out against this paper for doing this, right? >> that's right. a lot of people are not happy with the journal news. in a follow uparticle the paper says thousands reacted enraged, callers complained their privacy was violated and personal safety was at risk. one critical website is po
on the capital. they're search-rich and is a former french colony. they say the government is not honoring a cease five including release of political leaders. >> back in the u.s., the storm has come and gone and at least 16 deaths are blamed on the weather. in hard-hit arkansas, more than 135 homes and businesses remain without power. edward lawrence reporting. >> reporter: snow blowers and plows are pushing through a foot of snow in the upstate new york. the icy snow is a challenge for those who only have a shovel. >> it's been brutal. >> reporter: the storm drops several inches in the northeast and new england making it hard to get out and get around. streets are a problem in west virginia and maryland. this woman skit off the road and hit a mailbox. >> we just lost control. yeah, pretty scary. >> reporter: the weather is part of the same mass av system that crossed the country this week dumping snow from the west coast to the east coast and creating powerful tornadoes in the south. bad weather continues to delay flights in the northeast. that's bad news for holiday travelers trying to
. the mission of the government are saying in part of their manifestoes they want is to have been by 2015. i feel there is a more important issue in the debate last. they restarted their curriculum and now isn't the right time to look at same-sex marriage. thank you. [applause] >> food for thought for the east of england? yes, gentlemen from east of of england. thank you. >> i am part of a society that equal. as a matter if you're gay chemistry, man, woman, christian, muslim. however, there's a hurdle. it may just of them a safe language, but i believe passionately that the language is important. the weblog. if we want to encourage marriage to be important, which i believe it should, we need to have everyone regardless whether you're gay first-rate. thank you. [applause] >> colleagues, my record show we've not yet heard from him and from yorkshire and humberside. that man is not itching to address them forward to hearing from you, sir. >> leon cotler from north york shire. we are facing the campaign, not the issue. equal marriage is very topical minis. i wonder why. this is because during th
,000 people signed sniet we started yt we the people" so you could petition if government on the matters you care about the most. >> reporter: it allows anyone to create a petition and with 25,000 signatures in 30 days the white house promise as response. since the shooting the website has received more than a dozen petitions supporting gun rights and gun control, but the requests aren't always serious. >> that's not a moon. it's a space station. >> reporter: one asks the federal government to secure resources and 23u7bding to build a dealt star by 2016. it has 32,000 signatures. multiple states have asked to recede from the u.s. the move to kick morgan out of the country may have some support but laughing it off. tweeting merry christmas, even to those who want me deported. >> two others have pop up. one asked u.s. to keep him because britain doesn't want him back, the other says his spiech is protected. much of the admin station knew -- >> do they realize how social media -- >> there you go. >> consider can get a mass of people for anything. >>> it was a busy year
government, not raise taxes. it's not for 500 years or two generations. it's only as long as you're in the house or the senate. if he stayed too long, that's his problem. but you don't tell the bank, oh, the mortgage, wasn't that long time ago? if you make a commitment, you keep it. >> coming up, was mitt romney done in by his own party? when we come back, the republican presidential candidates who may have inflicted mortal damage on him rather than president obama. >> i'm just going to go back to the empty chair, which was going to be todd akin, who was going to talk to me about what hide said about rape and women. since it's just the chair, my obvious question would have about why are you such an offensive idiot to women? and the second obvious question, which again has to go to the chair unfortunately, would be why haven't you resigned yet? anyway, let's leave it there, shall we? they have carb steady, with carbs that digest slowly to help minimize blood sugar spikes. [ male announcer ] glucerna hunger smart. a smart way to help manage hunger and diabetes. make a wish! i wish
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